• Computer,  Games,  Hardware,  Intel,  PC Games,  PCs,  PlayStation,  Xbox

    This week in games: Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 gets battle royale, Stalker 2 teased

    Call of Duty: Black Ops IIII If last week was the week of E3 rumors, this is the week of delays. Phoenix Point, Metro: Exodus, and Skull & Bones were all pushed back this week, meaning the first few months of 2019 are already looking busy. There’s also a metric ton of Call of Duty news this week (including a battle royale confirmation), plus teases about Outlast III and Stalker 2, No Man’s Sky getting co-op multiplayer, Sea of Thieves and a giant shark, and details on SteamVR’s new controller mapping options. This is gaming news for May 14 to 18. [ Further reading: These 20 absorbing PC games will eat days of your life ] Call of Duty: Battle Royale MENTIONED IN THIS ARTICLE Call…

  • Computer,  Hardware,  Intel,  Microsoft,  Microsoft Windows,  PCs,  Software

    The best CPUs for gaming.

    Buying a processor for a gaming rig isn’t as hard as it used to be. Now that AMD’s Ryzen and Intel’s 8th-gen CPUs debuted with more performance and cores than ever before, it’s hard to buy a stinker these days—especially since most games favor graphics firepower over CPU oomph. But all that said, there are specific chips that stand out from the horde as the best gaming CPUs due to their price, performance, or nifty extras.

  • Computer,  Hardware,  Microsoft,  Microsoft Windows,  PCs,  Security Software,  Software

    How to protect your PC from the major Meltdown and Spectre CPU flaws

    A pair of nasty CPU flaws exposed this week have serious ramifications for home computer users. Meltdown and Spectre let attackers access protected information in your PC’s kernel memory, potentially revealing sensitive details like passwords, cryptographic keys, personal photos and email, or anything else you’ve used on your computer. It’s a serious flaw. Fortunately, CPU and operating system vendors pushed out patches fast, and you can protect your PC from Meltdown and Spectre to some degree. It’s not a quick one-and-done deal, though. They’re two very different CPU flaws that touch every part of your operating system, from hardware to software to the operating system itself. Check out PCWorld’s Meltdown…

  • Computer,  Microsoft Windows,  PCs,  Security Software,  Software,  Storage

    How to remove malware from your Windows PC

    Beware the signs of a potentially malware-infested PC: slower-than-usual performance, the recent occurrence of lots of pop-ups, and other weird issues. It’s possible your system has been infected by a virus, spyware, or other nefarious entity—even if you have an antivirus program installed. Yes, out-of-the-ordinary behavior is sometimes the result of hardware issues, but it’s best to first rule out malware if your PC is acting up. Here’s a step-by-step guide for taking action. Step 1: Enter Safe Mode Before you do anything, you need to disconnect your PC from the internet, and don’t use it until you’re ready to clean your PC. This can help prevent the malware from…

  • Audio,  Computer,  Hardware,  Movie,  Multi-Media,  Music

    Creative’s Super X-Fi Headphone Audio Holography demo blew my mind

    Creative More like this Tidal Force Wave 5 headpone review: Planar magnetic headphone tech on the cheap Focal Clear review: One of the finest headphones money can buy (and you’ll… Sony WH-1000XM2 noise-cancelling headphone review: These high-tech cans put… DealPosts Sonos Play:1 Is Discounted $62 Right Now On Amazon Creative has the demo to beat at this year’s CES. The company is showing an early prototype of a product it calls Super X-Fi Headphone Audio. And it blew my mind. Done right, object-based audio such as Dolby Atmos can be the next best thing to being at a live performance. The only problem is that the cost of the equipment…

  • Computer,  Hardware,  Intel,  Software,  Storage

    Intel announces Optane 800P SSD for the rest of us

    We’ve been waiting for this: Intel announced the first consumer Optane SSD on Tuesday at CES. Dubbed the 800P, Intel said two models of the 800P will ship in M.2 trim: a 58GB version and a 118GB version. Both will be bootable and will come with a two-lane (x2) PCIe configuration. The drives are rated to write more than 200GB per day. The 800P is the third of Intel’s much-hyped Optane drives. The first was Optane Memory; it used a 16GB or 32GB drive as a cache along with a mechanical drive and was intended for mainstream consumers. The second drive, the 280GB or 480GB 900P, is a high-performance PCIe…